CentOS 6 to CentOS 7 Upgrade Using Red Hat Upgrade Tool

CentOS 7 Supports In-Place Upgrading from CentOS 6.x for 64-bit Versions

This article covers upgrading a minimal CentOS 6.x system to CentOS 7. CentOS is a popular GNU/Linux OS for servers (including web servers) and workstations. Popular because it is a community based version of RHEL. CentOS is often an OS option when purchasing and setting up a VPS. The current major version of CentOS is version 7. CentOS 7 can be installed via an in-place upgrade over CentOS 6. However, CentOS 7 is only a 64-bit OS and therefore the system being upgraded has to be running 64-bit CentOS 6.

NOTE: This article is for archived information purposes only. According to the CentOS Upgrade Tool web page, the tool is currently broken.

To check if CentOS is 64-bit or 32-bit use the uname command with the -p option (p for processor):

[root@servername ~]# uname -p
x86_64

The 64-bit CentOS will display x86_64 and 32-bit will display i686.

CentOS 6 to CentOS 7 UpgradeWords of caution. If your system has been highly customised then performing an in-place upgrade from CentOS 6 to 7 may not be successful. In this case, as for upgrading a 32-bit system, a data backup, new CentOS 7 installation and data restore will be required. Do you need CentOS 7 now? There is also no need to rush to upgrade to CentOS 7. CentOS 6 will be receiving updates until the end of 2020. This article is for informational and test purposes only. You are responsible for you own actions and an in-place upgrade from CentOS 6 to CentOS 7 is probably more trouble than doing a fresh CentOS 7 install and data restore. For example upgrading a minimal CentOS 6.6. to CentOS 7 may not work according to this bug report.

The other consideration is whether the new CentOS 7 features will hinder operation of your system. The new features may require changes to the normal workflow or they may be incompatible with software that is being used on the system. Whilst the CentOS 7 Release Notes list some major changes the RHEL 7 Release Notes has a detailed discussion. Continue reading